college of arts & sciences

Regeneration Bonus: Ashley Seifert

When we talked to the four biologists that make up the unofficial regeneration "cluster" at the University of Kentucky, we learned too many interesting things to cram in the group video. So we made a short video for each of them. Here's more on Ashley Seifert, postdoc Tom Gawriluk, and African spiny mice.

This video appears courtesy of UK Research Media.

Story: uknow.uky.edu/content/regeneration-bonus-ashley-seifert-0

 

 

50th Anniversary of UK's Particle Accelerator

Celebrating its 50th anniversary on UK’s campus, the Accelerator Lab is the giant cylinder in front of the Chem/Phys Building. Mysterious to many visitors to campus, and affectionately but incorrectly referred to as the “Atom Smasher” by others, it houses a 7-million-volt small particle accelerator used by the Physics Department for various experiments, such as studying the form and shapes of stable nuclei.

Marcus T. McEllistrem, the man that helped bring the accelerator to campus reflects back on some of its history.

 

 

Making Waves in the Milky Way with Susan Gardner

From childhood, Susan Gardner has had an interest in how the world works, developing a sense of curiosity that would later fuel her work and inspire her research.  Recently, Gardner, a professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy, played an important role in a study that was responsible for the discovery of a wave in the Milky Way Galaxy. In this podcast, we spoke to Susan Gardner about this discovery, its relation to her research, and the importance of curiosity.

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard.

Creative Commons License
Making Waves in the Milky Way with Susan Gardner by UK College of A&S is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

2015 van Winter Memorial Lecture

TItle: "The Master's Hand" Can image analysis detect the hand of the Master? 

Abstract:  The talk will describe wavelets, a mathematical tool used for the analysis and compression of images (including for digital cinema).Then it will go on to discuss how they have been used recently for the study of paintings by e.g. Van Gogh, Goossen van der Weyden, Gauguin, and Giotto.

About the speaker: Professor Daubechies obtained her Ph.D. in theoretical physics in 1980, and worked at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel until 1987. At the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in New York, she made her best-known discovery: based on quadrature mirror filter-technology, she constructed compactly supported continuous wavelets that would require only a finite amount of processing. This breakthrough enabled wavelet theory to enter the realm of digital signal processing.

In July 1987, Dr. Daubechies joined the AT&T Bell Laboratories' New Jersey facility at Murray Hill. From 1994 to 2010, Dr. Daubechies was a Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University where she directed the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics. She was the first female full Professor of Mathematics at Princeton. Dr. Daubechies currently works as a James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics at Duke University.

Professor Daubechies received the Louis Empain Prize for Physics in 1984. In 1994, she received the American Mathematical Society (AMS) Steele Prize for Exposition for her book “Ten Lectures on Wavelets”, and gave a plenary lecture at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Zurich. In 1997, she was awarded the AMS Ruth Lyttle Satter prize. Professor Daubechies was elected to the United States National Academy of Sciences in 1998. In 2000, Professor Daubechies became the first woman to receive the National Academy of Sciences Award in Mathematics for excellence in published mathematical research. In 2006 she was the Emmy Noether Lecturer at the San Antonio Joint Mathematics Meetings. She won 2012 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Basic Sciences category (jointly with David Mumford) and the 2012 Nemmers Prize in Mathematics from Northwestern University. She was the first woman president of the International Mathematical Union (2011- 2014).

Additional information is available at www.math.uky.edu/van-winter

Photo credit of Ingrid Daubechies - David von Becker

Date: 
Thursday, February 26, 2015 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Chemistry-Physics 155
Type of Event (for grouping events):

A&S Hall of Fame

Date: 
Friday, October 10, 2014 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Singletary Center Recital Hall
Type of Event (for grouping events):

UK Awarded $1.9 Million to Improve Retention of STEM Majors

Howard Hughes Medical Institute funds five-year project to promote student achievement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, in collaboration with BCTC

Greenhouse Bike Giveaway

Greenhouse, the new Living Learning Program put together by a partnership between the College of Arts & Sciences and the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is opening its doors next semester. As an incentive for students to join the new community, Greenhouse has organized a giveaway of several new bikes.

Here, UK Office of Sustainability Coordinator Shane Tedder discusses the giveaway, the Greenhouse Living Learning Community, and the benefits of having a bike at UK.

This podcast was produced by David Cole.

Creative Commons License
Greenhouse Bike Giveaway by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Workshop in Ancient Philosophy

Co-hosted by the Philosophy Department at the University of Kentucky and the Departments of Philosophy and Classics at Transylvania University, the conference will be held on March 21-22 on the campuses of the University of Kentucky and Transylvania University.

When The Levee Breaks: Derek Sawyer's Research Goes To Great Depths

For most Americans, levees are man-made engineering projects, rarely mentioned outside of the flooding that follows disasters like Hurricane Katrina.However, recent research conducted by Earth and Environmental Science (EES) Assistant Professor Derek Sawyer published in the journal “Geology” sheds new light on levees most of us never see – those built naturally by underwater rivers deep below the ocean’s surface.

Rarefied Air: Liz Pillar

The American Geophysical Union (AGU) is a nonprofit organization of geophysicists with over 62,000 members from 144 countries. At their most recent meeting last December, 24,000 people presented and discussed the newest interdisciplinary and international research in geophysics, which makes Liz Pillar’s accomplishments all the more impressive.

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