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Festival Latino de Lexington

 

 

Festival Latino de Lexington is an annual event that bring crowds in excess of 30,000 people to the Courthouse Plaza in downtown Lexington to celebrate Latino culture and heritage. The two day event is packed with a parade, music, dancing, authentic cuisine, art vendors, youth activities, and a fireworks display. It is also an event that the University of Kentucky actively engages in, and this past year was no different, as a group of visiting Ecuadorian scholars with the Center for English as a Second Language (CESL) performed a traditional dance routine. CESL hosts visiting scholars from around the world, and cultural events like Festival Latino de Lexington allow our visitors to not only experience such events, but actively participate in sharing their culture with the people of Kentucky.

To learn more about the Center for English as a Second Language visit esl.as.uky.edu

 

 

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 2

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 3

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 1

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Celebrate 2013: Ben Chandler

 

 

The Honorable Albert B. Chandler III (Ben Chandler) received his B.A. in history in 1983 and his J.D. in 1986. He was elected Kentucky Attorney General in 1995 and served as the United States Representative for Kentucky's 6th congressional district from 2004 to 2013. A long-time supporter of arts and humanities at the state and national level, he is now executive director the Kentucky Humanities Council.

 

 

Celebrate 2013: Paul G. Sears

 

 

Dr. Paul G. Sears, in the Department of Chemistry, earned his B.S. in Industrial Chemistry in 1950, as well as his Ph.D. in 1953 both from UK. He served as a professor of Chemistry for 28 years, where he influenced the lives of more than 7,200 undergraduates before retiring in 1990. He also served on the UK Board of Trustees for 12 years, including terms as assistant secretary and as secretary, as well as on President Otis Singletary's council as faculty assistant to the president.

 

 

Celebrate 2013: Jane Vance

Dr. Jane Vance, in the Department of English, served as Kentucky's Poet Laureate from 2007 to 2008. While teaching at the University of Kentucky, she taught in the UK Honors program and won the UK Alumni Association’s Great Teacher Award. She has published two full-length collections of poetry, "Portrait of the Artist as a White Pig" and "A Garden in Kentucky." Her poems have appeared widely in journals as well. She has been awarded two Al Smith Fellowships from the Kentucky Arts Council and has held fellowships at Yaddo in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., and at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

Celebrate 2013: Robert Rich

Robert E. Rich received his B.A. in English from the University of Kentucky in 1966 and his J.D. from Harvard University. A partner at Taft, Stettinius, & Hollister, Rich specializes in tax and health care law and estate planning. In 2007, the Cincinnati Bar Foundation named Rich the co-recipient of the John W. Warrington Community Service Award for his decades of volunteer and community service. He was also a founding member and past chair of the A&S Alumni Advisory Board and is former president of the Kentucky Historical Society (KHS) Executive Committee Board.

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