anthropology

UK Archaeologist Digs Up Kentucky History on National TV

 

 

The Hatfield-McCoy Feud is now infamous across the country thanks to the mini-series that aired in 2012. Thanks to the help of UK Professor Kim McBride, the National Geographic Channel's "Diggers" recently made an important discovery about this famous feud. "Diggers: Hatfields & McCoys" airs Tuesday, January 29 on National Geographic Channel.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit http://uknow.uky.edu. A direct link to this story is uknow.uky.edu/content/uk-archaeologist-helps-unearth-hatfield-and-mccoy-artifacts

 

 

UK Archaeologist Helps Unearth Hatfield and McCoy Artifacts

A notorious feud between the Hatfields of West Virginia and the McCoys of Kentucky is once again making national news, but this time it is hitting a little closer to home. A discovery of artifacts associated with patriarch Randall McCoy’s home and site of an infamous 1888 attack were confirmed by Kim McBride, a historic archaeologist with the Kentucky Archaeological Survey, a joint partnership with the University of Kentucky Department of Anthropology and the Kentucky Heritage Council/State Historic Preservation Office.

"Freedom from Camps": Housing and Power in the Experience of Sri Lankan Long-term Refugees in India

Date: 
Friday, January 11, 2013 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Lafferty 213

 

 

The Anthropology Department Presents:  

"Freedom from Camps": Housing and Power in the Experience of Sri Lankan Long-term Refugees in India, with Dr. Sasikumar Balasundaram

Friday, January 11th from 4:00 – 5:30 PM in Lafferty 213

This event is open to all. 

 

My Old Kentucky Road

Roads are products of the places they wind through and have rich histories that modern drivers often ignore. Travelers have not always been able to take them for granted, however, particularly in the mountainous regions of Appalachia in the days before cars.

Uncovering Lost Communities

Over the summer a team of faculty and students from University of Kentucky discovered evidence of not just one lost community, but two in northern Italy.

Celebrate A&S: 2012 Hall of Fame Inductee Susan Abbott-Jamieson

Susan Abbott-Jamieson joined UK as an assistant professor of anthropology in 1974, became an associate professor in 1980 and served as the chair of the department from 1990-1994. She retired in 1998 and began an applied research and program-development position with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). She served as Lead Social Scientist in the NMFS Office of Science and Technology from 2002-2011.

A fellowship established in her name, the “Susan Abbott-Jamieson Dissertation Research Fund Award” is given annually to graduate students in the Department of Anthropology to support pre-dissertation research. Abbott-Jamieson was also awarded a Bronze medal by the U.S. Department of Commerce for her work on Hurricane Katrina’s damage to the gulf fishing industry. Currently, she is the President of Abbott-Jamieson Consulting, Ltd and works on fisheries anthropology, environmental policy, and the oral history of occupations.

UK Archaeology Project Featured in American Archaeology Magazine

Adjunct Anthropology Professor Kim McBride's 22 years of archaeological work at Pleasant Hill, a former Shaker community approximately 30 miles southwest of Lexington, was recently featured in the national publication, American Archaeology magazine. The magazine's seven-page feature highlights McBride's extensive work at Pleasant Hill, which includes directing a series of field schools in which more than 100 students have located former building sites throughout the village.

The Politics of Latin American Migration

Date: 
Friday, October 12, 2012 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
231 Student Center
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Professor David Cook-Martin from Grinnell College and Professor Christian Zlolniski from University of Texas will be discussing immigration in politics and beyond.

Contact Carmen Martinez Novo, Director of Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies Program: carmen.martinez@uky.edu.

Stones of Fire and Sky: A Social History of Ancient Maya Lithic Artifacts

Date: 
Monday, September 17, 2012 - 5:28pm to 6:28pm
Location: 
Room 108 of Lafferty Hall
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Return to Hardin Village: Protohistoric Craft Production and Interregional Interaction on the Ohio River

Date: 
Friday, November 2, 2012 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall room 108

 

Please join the Department of Anthropology for the Archaeology Rountable event “Return to Hardin Village: Protohistoric Craft Production and Interregional Interaction on the Ohio River” with Matt Davidson from the Department of Anthropology at UK . 

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