psychology

Driving Simulator - Dr. Mark Fillmore’s Research Lab

A STISIM® Driving Simulator used to demonstrate driving in an urban environment under the influence of alcohol and in the sober state.

For more information please visit psychology.as.uky.edu/

Tobii® (T120) Eyetracking System - Dr. Mark Fillmore’s Research Lab

A demonstration of the Tobii® (T120) Eyetracking System showing how the system tracks the movements of the eye.

For more information please visit psychology.as.uky.edu/

The Origins of Religious Disbelief: Will Gervais

According to recent research, approximately one in five Americans don’t identify with a religion. Will Gervais, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, studies the origins of atheism, and is a recent addition to UK's faculty. In January 2013, he co-authored an article, "The Origins of Religious Disbelief," in the journal, Trends in cognitive sciences. Co-written with Ara Norenzayan from the University of British Columbia, the article defines four different types of atheism and their origins. 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Gaines Fellowship Awarded to 12 UK Scholars

The University of Kentucky Gaines Center for the Humanities has chosen 12 outstanding undergraduates as new scholars for the university's Gaines Fellowship Program for the 2013-14 and 2014-15 academic years.

The Meaning of Life: Will Gervais

During the 2013 fall semester, University of Kentucky students will have the opportunity to delve into questions that explore some of society's most deeply held beliefs. The ambitiously titled class, "A&S 300: The Meaning of Life - Psychology, Evolution, Religion, and Morality," will be led by Psychology Professor Will Gervais who has focused his research around this very topic.

In the class, students can expect to investigate the psychological and evolutionary underpinnings of religious and moral beliefs through studies of cognitive and evolutionary science. Gervais hopes to use this lens to encourage students to not ask questions around whether or not a higher power exists, but instead question why people believe what they do and the implications of that on society.
 
In this podcast, Gervais touches on these issues and how now more than ever, it's important that we use the tools of science to examine the roles of religion and morality.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Actor Charles Black "sees blue" in New York City

The best learning — and the most profound educational experiences — often take place outside the traditional classroom. For Charles Black, such experiences have guided him as he has taken his education at the University of Kentucky to frequent appearances on New York stages and TV shows.

Honors Students Present Research at Kentucky Honors Roundtable

The Kentucky Honors Roundtable allows undergraduate students to present their research projects, serve on academic panels and interact with academically excelling students from other Kentucky institutions. This year the conference hosted approximately 60 presentations, spanning over a range of diverse topics.

UK Undergraduates Discuss "Posters-at-the-Capitol"

 

 

Fifteen UK students will join hundreds of other undergraduates from around the state to present "Posters at the Capitol" in Frankfort on Feb. 21, 2013. Now in its 12th year, the event gives these students an opportunity to showcase their research projects to state legislators, emphasizing the importance of research in universities.

This video comes courtesy of UK Public Relations and Marketing

 

 

Technology on Students' Terms: Jonathan Golding

Technology in the classroom is often discussed in terms of solving issues of scale—the rise of massively open online courses just being the largest of examples. Perhaps though, technology may serve the most good when it's scaled to student needs.

Psychology Professor Jonathan Golding has found this to be the case in the many classes he teaches. As he has increasing experimented with tools like Facebook and blogs, Golding has found that the most gains come in the small interactions between students, where they learn to deal with themselves on their own terms, as real individuals. The result: a more productive learning environment made more intimate—not less—by the latest technology. 
 
In this podcast, Professor Golding discusses how he uses modern social media platforms like Facebook to change the way his students interact with him and each other while also noting some of the tensions that exist when incorporating technology into the classroom.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

'UK at the Half' Features Center on Drug Abuse Research Translation Director Michael Bardo

Michael Bardo, University of Kentukcy psychology professor and director of the Center on Drug Abuse Research Translation, was the guest on Saturday's "UK at the Half," which aired during the UK vs. Auburn game that was broadcast on radio.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - psychology