research

UK Researcher Allan Butterfield Earns 2013 Discovery Award

The Society for Free Radical Biology & Medicine recently named the University of Kentucky's Dr. Allan Butterfield as the recipient of its 2013 Discovery Award.

The Politics of Catastrophe: Joan Braune

What do politics have to do with the end of the world? UK Philosophy graduate Joan Braune recently finished her dissertation, which is focused on Erich Fromm's role - and break from - the Frankfurt School. She thinks that the connection between political renewal and dreams of catastrophe are detrimental to progress. Braune discussed some of her research at Villanova University's April 2013 conference, "Apocalyptic Politics: Framing the Present," and shares her research in this podcast. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Research Rewarded: Marcelo Guzman

Chemistry Professor Marcelo Guzman was recently awarded a five year National Science Foundation (NSF) career grant to aid in his atmospheric chemistry research with students here at the University of Kentucky.

The grant will also enable Guzman to extend the reach of the university and chemistry department by strengthening and creating new connections with other institutions such as local high schools.

In this podcast, Professor Guzman discusses how the grant will be used, some potential applications for the research he’ll be conducting, and the joy he finds working with students in the laboratory.

 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

UK Faculty Named Fulbright Recipients

Sponsored by the United States Department of State, and the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program, which provides funding to undertake graduate study, advanced research, university teaching, and teaching.

Poetry to Heal PTSD: Travis Martin

We often hear about veterans that can't shake traumatic experiences and memories of war, but what about those who find ways to cope? Travis Martin, a PhD candidate in English, is doing research to document the ways in which veterans use the arts to process and move past trauma. He is the President of Military Experience and the Arts, a project that connects veterans with resources and outlets for their artwork, poetry, fiction, and scholarship, as well as the Veterans' PTSD Project, which seeks to dispel stereotypes about post-traumatic stress disorder by giving veterans a voice.

In this podcast, he reads and discusses three of his poems, “A Little Boy With Bananas,” “The Writing on the Wall,” and “Rifling About,” all of which reflect on his combat experiences in Iraq and life after returning home. The first two were featured in the New York Times, and the third can be downloaded here

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Tracy Campbell Discusses History of St. Louis Gateway Arch

UK History professor and Pulitzer Prize nominated author Tracy A. Campbell's latest book, "The Gateway Arch: A Biography," explores the political and economic history of St. Louis and the origins of the city's most recognized structure. Campbell also serves as co-director of UK's Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center.

This story first appeared on UKNow, the University of Kentucky's official news source. Visit uky.edu/UKNow. A direct link to this - uknow.uky.edu/content/campbells-new-book-explores-complex-history-st-louis-gateway-arch

For more information on Tracy Campbell and UK's Department of History visit: history.as.uky.edu/

Campbell's New Book Explores Complex History of St. Louis Gateway Arch

"When we think about a skyscraper, cathedral, or monument, we seldom ask: what was there before? Who benefited from its construction? Who lost? What could have been?" UK History professor and Pulitzer Prize nominated author Tracy A. Campbell said.

Light-Activated Cancer Drugs with Chemistry's Phoebe Glazer

At the University of Kentucky, Assistant Professor of Chemistry Edith "Phoebe" Glazer is looking for something more effective at killing cancer cells and less toxic to healthy cells than cisplatin. A platinum-based drug, cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, but leads to nausea and nerve damage. Her alternative uses ruthenium, another transition metal, to build complex molecules. Theses molecules can be "switched on" by light from a fiber-optic probe once they reach their target tumor and would kill only cancerous cells. In January 2013, Glazer received a four-year, $715,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to develop a family of ruthenium molecules to fight different kinds of cancer.

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/

Astronomy Professor Researches Latest Hubble Space Telescope Images

For UK physics and astronomy professor Gary Ferland, the latest images of the Ring Nebula, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, provide an invaluable resource to understand more about dying stars similar to the sun.

Campbell to Discuss "The Gateway Arch: A Biography" on NPR's Weekend Edition

UK History professor Tracy A. Campbell's most recent work, "The Gateway Arch: A Biography", is already drawing national attention. Campbell will discuss his book on National Public Radio's "Weekend Edition" with Scott Simon this weekend.

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